Dating fender utah speakers

Blackface amps were immediately popular upon release and used on numerous famous recordings.

They continue to be a backline and recording mainstay of musicians who seek a great, chimey Fender clean and, when pushed, a classic overdriven tone.

And of course, your Champ can be mic’d to be used in just about any size venue.

Just grab your guitar and this little powerhouse and head out to the gig.

These amps, fondly referred to as the “lunch box,” were sold by the thousands to students and professionals alike.

Immediately popular for studio use, they also found favor from musicians playing small gigs.

The tuxedo was the result of the ever-thrifty Leo Fender wanting to use up the remaining “brownface” Princeton Amp chassis and cabinets.

Issued from mid-1963 to mid-1964, the tuxedo amps featured Blackface cosmetics, but were very snazzy looking with white barrel knobs.

The first three numbers represent the company that made the speaker, the fourth (and fifth if there are seven numbers) represent the year the part was made, and the last two numbers represent the week that the part was made during that year.

Find the source code stamp, which is a series of six or seven numbers, that will be stamped on the speaker.

The stamp can be found on any part of the speaker, but it will be readily visible no matter the location.

Make note that a source code beginning with 220 was made by Jenson, 328 by Utah, 285 Rola, 137 CTS and 134 by Centralab.

Amps with Utah speakers are usually dated to 1945 and earlier, and Rola speakers from the late 1940ss and early 1950s.

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Always verify the serial number of a vintage Gibson amp with the company before purchasing the amp.

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